Take Action

2021 Election Resources

Step 1: Make sure you are registered to vote

Even if you think you are already registered to vote, it’s a good idea to check your registration to make sure it’s active and current. Sometimes voters are removed from the rolls, and you don’t want to wait until Election Day to find out that your registration is not current. Find out how to check your registration and learn how to register to vote at: ncvoter.org/registering-to-vote 

If you are justice-involved, it is very likely that you can still vote. If you are convicted of a misdemeanor, you NEVER lose your right to vote. If you are convicted of a felony, you only TEMPORARILY lose your right to vote. Learn more at: demnc.co/notlockedout

Step 2: Find out who is on your ballot

Before you vote, you can look up who will be on your ballot. This will give you a chance to research the positions of the district attorneys, judges, sheriffs, mayors, and city council members who may be up for election this year. Learn how to look up your ballot at: ncvoter.org/whats-on-my-ballot

Step 3: Learn about the ways you can vote

Follow each of the links below to learn more about the three ways to vote this year:

Step 4: Vote!

Make a plan to vote and implement it. There are many important races on the ballot this year that will impact how your local criminal legal system will interact with your community. If you have any questions at all about voting, please visit ncvoter.org or call 888-OUR-VOTE (888-687-8683). 

Use Your Vote

YOU have the power to elect officials that will make your community more equitable and truly safer for everyone.

Make a Plan to Vote in Every Election 

  • Elections for local district attorneys, sheriffs, judges, mayors, and city council members are won and lost by many fewer votes than statewide and federal elections. Your vote matters even more in these local races.
  • Local officials are often elected on “off” years from presidential elections, and as a result, they often have much lower turnout. Your vote will make a big difference in these elections, so make sure you vote in every primary and election you can.
  • Because criminal legal reform issues are not always clearly partisan, it is important to research the candidate carefully. It is not always easy to predict a candidate’s position on criminal legal issues based on their party affiliation alone.
  • Be sure to vote in primaries as well as general elections. Many localities are heavily over-represented by one party. In these areas, the outcome of any given race is often determined in a primary, because the winner will go on to stand uncontested in the general election.
  • The choices these officials make will have a much more direct impact on your community that statewide and federal races. How your local criminal legal system affects your community is determined by local elections.

Make Sure You Know When and How to Vote

  • Make sure you are registered to vote. Learn more at ncvoter.org/registering-to-vote or by calling 1-888-OUR-VOTE.
  • Make sure you know when and where all your local elections are held. Up-to-date information can be found at ncvoter.org or by calling 1-888-OUR-VOTE.
  • If you are justice-involved, it is very likely that you can still vote. If you are convicted of a misdemeanor, you NEVER lose your right to vote. If you are convicted of a felony, you only TEMPORARILY lose your right to vote. Learn more at: demnc.co/notlockedout

 

NC Voter Resources

NCVoter.org is a one-stop, nonpartisan voting resource created by Democracy North Carolina. There you can find up-to-date information on every upcoming primary and general election in North Carolina.